8 Best Beginner Banjos 2020 – Reviews, Brands to Avoid & More!

best beginner banjo

Choosing the best banjo from thousands of options before you can learn how to play can be a daunting task. What are the essential features you should look for? How much should you spend on your first banjo?

If you’re in the market for your first banjo, we’re here to help. In this guide, we review the best starter banjos. We’ll also answer some of the most common questions you’re likely to have when getting your good first banjo.

Best Beginner Banjos for 2020: Comparison Chart

Model
Editor's Pick
Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo
Budget Pick
Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo
Upgrade Pick
Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo
Rover RB-20 5 String Banjo
Pyle PBJ60 Five-String Banjo
Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek
Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo 24 Bracket with Closed Solid Back and Geared 5th Tuner
Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo with 24 Brackets with Closed Back and Geared 5th Tuner
Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo
Rover RB-20 Open Back 5 String Banjo
5-String Geared Tunable Banjo with White Jade Tune Pegs & Rosewood Fretboard Polished Rich Wood Finish Maplewood Bridge Stand & Truss Rod Adjustment Tool- Pyle PBJ60
Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek Banjo with Resonator (Five String, Clear Maple)
Brand
Jameson Guitars
Resoluute
Deering
Rover
Pyle
Gold Tone
Type
Resonator
Resonator
Open-back
Open-back
Resonator
Resonator
Weight (lbs)
5
5.5
4
4.15
7.21
6.5
Price
Price not available
Price not available
$459.98
$239.30
Price not available
Price not available
Editor's Pick
Model
Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo
Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo 24 Bracket with Closed Solid Back and Geared 5th Tuner
Brand
Jameson Guitars
Type
Resonator
Weight (lbs)
5
Price
Price not available
Amazon
Budget Pick
Model
Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo
Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo with 24 Brackets with Closed Back and Geared 5th Tuner
Brand
Resoluute
Type
Resonator
Weight (lbs)
5.5
Price
Price not available
Amazon
Upgrade Pick
Model
Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo
Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo
Brand
Deering
Type
Open-back
Weight (lbs)
4
Price
$459.98
Amazon
Model
Rover RB-20 5 String Banjo
Rover RB-20 Open Back 5 String Banjo
Brand
Rover
Type
Open-back
Weight (lbs)
4.15
Price
$239.30
Amazon
Model
Pyle PBJ60 Five-String Banjo
5-String Geared Tunable Banjo with White Jade Tune Pegs & Rosewood Fretboard Polished Rich Wood Finish Maplewood Bridge Stand & Truss Rod Adjustment Tool- Pyle PBJ60
Brand
Pyle
Type
Resonator
Weight (lbs)
7.21
Price
Price not available
Amazon
Model
Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek
Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek Banjo with Resonator (Five String, Clear Maple)
Brand
Gold Tone
Type
Resonator
Weight (lbs)
6.5
Price
Price not available
Amazon

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

8 Top Picks of Starter Banjos

#1: Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo

Looking for a banjo that strikes the ultimate balance between pricing and features? If you are, the Jameson 5-String Banjo makes for a very strong contender.

Right off the bat, you’ll notice the quality craftsmanship of this banjo. The instrument offers 24 brackets with a closed solid back, creating an incredible resonant sound. Both the resonator and neck are made of mahogany. Factor in the high-gloss finish and you have an instrument that not only sounds great but also looks sleek and polished.

Instead of the friction tuner incorporated in regular banjos, Jameson sports a geared 5th tuner, which is certainly superior.

Furthermore, the banjo has a lightweight design tipping the scales at just 9.6 pounds. Thus, you’ll be able to practice playing this musical instrument for as long as you want and without getting fatigued.

Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo 24 Bracket with Closed Solid Back and Geared 5th Tuner
  • 5 String Full Size Banjo with Geared 5th Tuner
  • Amazing Low Price on Best Selling Banjo
  • 24 Bracket with Closed Mahogany Back; Nut Width - 1.25 inches
  • Made by Jameson/Davison Guitar Company. Overall length - 38 inches
  • Ships Fast - Top Seller - Customer Favorite

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Offers a decent performance
  • Lightweight enough to hold and carry
  • Equipped with an adjustable hinged tailpiece
  • Sturdy build
  • Inexpensive banjo

Cons

  • Quality of the strings can be improved

Need more information? Read full Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo review.

#2: Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo

Have you been searching for a pocket-friendly banjo that doesn’t compromise on quality? Well, the Resoluute 5 String Resonator fits this description perfectly. It’s also the best budget banjo.

A key highlight of this beginner banjo is the detachable mahogany resonator. This results in the bright sound you’d expect from a closed-back banjo as well as the mellow tone associated with open-back banjos. Thanks to this feature, you can play a variety of banjo styles from clawhammer to bluegrass.

Beginners will also appreciate the guide that will help them learn the basics of this musical instrument as soon as it’s delivered.

The fingerboard is constructed from maple and the banjo is equipped with 24 brackets that keep the head tension uniform. Even better, it has a geared 5th banjo tuner that allows for more accurate tuning.

Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo with 24 Brackets with Closed Back and Geared 5th Tuner
  • 5 STRING Full Size Banjo with Geared 5th Tuner
  • RESONATOR mahogany closed back for bluegrass or clawhammer style banjo
  • 24 BRACKETS for nice loud ring and tone, PROFESSIONAL REMO drumhead and MAPLE fingerboard
  • Comes ASSEMBLED and includes BONUS BANJO BOOK with chord charts
  • Measures 38" long, and 13.5" across at the widest part. Weighs 5.5lbs.

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Easy to learn banjo with a detailed instruction guide
  • Has a removable resonator

Cons

  • Quality of the brackets can be improved

Need more information? Read full Resoluute 5 String Banjo review.

#3: Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo

Coming in with a hefty price tag, the Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo is another option worth considering. While the high price might discourage some buyers, this is one of those instruments that you can play as a beginner and even as an advanced musician.

Deering describes the Goodtime as an entry-level banjo, meaning it’s suitable for novice players. However, this doesn’t mean that they’ve made any compromises in its construction. If you examine it closely, you’ll notice that its build is expertly done.

The materials used are nothing short of exceptional. For instance, the 3-ply shell is constructed from violin-grade maple. This makes a significant contribution to the instrument’s tonal attributes. Also, there’s a single metal coordinator rod concealed inside the shell. This provides additional strength to the pot/shell.

When it comes to playability, the Goodtime is a delight to play. The neck has a smooth, fast, and silky feel and it’s ergonomically-shaped to enhance comfort.

Now, since this is an open-back banjo, it’s well-suited for styles that are traditionally played on such models like clawhammer and frailing.

Sale
Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo
  • Low-profile, 22-fret rock maple neck with hardwood bow tie inlays
  • Sealed, geared tuning machines, including fifth string
  • 5/8-Inch maple/ebony Goodtime bridge with adjustable Deering tailpiece
  • Six-year warranty
  • Three-ply, 11-inch maple rim with steel tension hoop and high crown head

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Has a classic look and sound
  • Well-built
  • Lightweight; hence portable
  • Great intermediate banjo as well

Cons

  • Expensive

Need more information? Read full Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo review.

#4: Rover RB-20 Open Back 5 String Banjo

The Rover RB-20 is an excellent beginner banjo that comes at a mid-range price. This way, you don’t have to worry about spending too much on your first instrument since you’re still learning the ropes.

This open-back banjo has a grooved tension hoop that makes for great tonal stability. The fingerboard is made of East Indian Rosewood- an exotic species of wood which gives the banjo a warmer sound.

The adjustable truss rod is another handy addition to this banjo. It allows the neck to curve slightly, enabling you to adjust the playability of the instrument.

Rover RB-20 banjo has a lightweight design thanks to the 11-inch composite rim used in its construction. This material makes the banjo comfortable to play without compromising on sound.

Rover RB-20 Open Back 5 String Banjo
  • Standard 11" rim made of composite material in metallic gun grey finish Grooved tension hoop
  • Standard spacing using 24 Flat hook and nut set for head attachment
  • Deluxe Vega style armrest Traditional No knot tailpiece
  • Exquisite mahogany neck with East Indian Rosewood fingerboard inlaid dot position markers and adjustable truss rod
  • Guitar style geared tuners with a geared 5th peg Standard 25 1/2" scale length

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Composite rim for a lightweight build
  • Adjustable truss rod
  • Grooved tension hoop provides tonal stability

Cons

  • A little difficult to set up for a beginner

Need more information? Read full Rover RB-20 Open Back 5 String Banjo review.

#5: Pyle PBJ60 Five-String Banjo

The Pyle PBJ60 offers a splendid opportunity to help you get started on playing the banjo without spending a ton of money.

Despite being reasonably priced, it’s constructed using quality materials so it doesn’t compromise on durability. To put this into perspective, it has a REMO M1 drumhead; the neck, back, and side are made of mahogany while the fingerboard is made of rosewood.

The Maplewood bridge and chrome-plated hardware further enhance its sleek and professional look. The Pyle PBJ60 is the perfect example of a musical instrument that can double up as a house decor item.

We also like that this instrument is lightweight. It weighs a measly 7.21 pounds making it light enough to carry around. This also means that you can play the instrument for long hours without getting overly tired.

The only thing you might not like about Pyle PBJ60 is that it requires assembly. Unlike other banjos that come already set up, this one requires you to install the bridge and tweak other parts to get it working.

5-String Geared Tunable Banjo with White Jade Tune Pegs & Rosewood Fretboard Polished Rich Wood Finish Maplewood Bridge Stand & Truss Rod Adjustment Tool- Pyle PBJ60
  • PREMIUM QUALITY - The rich wood and high-gloss finish are accented with white jade machine head tuner key pegs and chrome-plated hardware. Crafted with mahogany neck, back, and side, plus a rosewood fingerboard and Maple Wood bridge
  • FABULOUS TONE - Brings you all the classic tones of a traditional 5 string banjo. Perfect for country, folk, bluegrass, and even some modern rock. It's designed to sound as good as it looks
  • GEARED 5TH TUNER - Important for both tuning and playability. A premium feature usually found only on more expensive banjos this geared 5th tuner is an important upgrade over the common friction tuner
  • LIGHTWEIGHT - Full scale & lightweight ideal for traveling, camping, hiking, taking to the beach. Whether you are pro, a weekend warrior, a hobbyist or a beginner: Start playing your favorite songs right away
  • CLASSIC TRADITIONAL STYLE - Styled after the innovative models of the early 20th century, these new/old banjos are true players that exude undeniably providing a vibrant singing banjo tone in any situation

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Durable thanks to the high quality of materials
  • Lightweight and elegant design
  • Affordable

Cons

  • Requires a small setup

Need more information? Read full Pyle PBJ60 Five-String Banjo review.

#6: Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek

Are you a student looking for a quality banjo? If so, the Gold Tone CC-100R is your best bet. It has a good selection of features that you’ll not find in other beginner banjos.

Starting with its construction, this banjo is beautifully-designed. The body and neck are made of maple with a multi-ply maple rim. The fingerboard, in particular, is constructed using ovangkol- a type of dense wood extracted from the evergreen Guibourtia ehie tree.

If you factor in the gold-tone inscribed armrest and the 13-inch maple resonator, you’ll agree that the manufacturer has taken the construction of this beginner instrument a notch higher. Also, the neck is bulkier than usual – an aspect that facilitates better spacing between the strings.

You can rely on Gold Tone Banjo to deliver superb sound each time you play it. It generates a sweet and crisp tone, which is perfect for bluegrass and other playing styles. The resonator results in louder volume, which is often lacking in open-back banjos.

Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek Banjo with Resonator (Five String, Clear Maple)
  • Body: MapleNeck: MapleResonator: MapleTone Ring: BrassTruss Rod: Two-way adjustableTailpiece: Straight Line
  • Tailpiece Other Features: Neck binding, Curly maple headstock veneer, Low action

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • It comes all set-up and ready to play
  • An entry-level banjo with high-end features
  • Produces great sound and amplified volume

Cons

  • Costs more than other beginner banjos

Need more information? Read full Gold Tone CC-100R Cripple Creek review.

#7: Oscar Schmidt OB5 Gloss Mahogany

If you prefer purchasing your first banjo from a reputable brand, the OB5 5-String Banjo made by Oscar Schmidt Inc. is a superb choice. This firm has been making stringed instruments for more than a century, so you can be sure of getting a high-quality, entry-level banjo.

One thing we like about this banjo is that it’s also easy to set up. The manufacturer includes a clip-on tuner, making it simple to assemble. However, if you’re not familiar with the task of tuning, you can consult a fellow banjo player or visit your local instrument store.

The banjo boasts quality construction. It’s a combination of rich wood starting from the mahogany back to the nato neck. If you account for the white head and reddish-brown accents, you get a banjo that not only plays well but also looks good.

Oscar Schmidt OB5 Gloss Mahogany 5-String Banjo
  • 30 bracket cast aluminum tone ring
  • Mahogany resonator
  • Geared 5th string tuner
  • Fancy traditional fingerboard inlays
  • Rosewood fingerboard

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Stylish design
  • A removable resonator that allows for different banjo styles
  • Includes several accessories that are handy for the beginner banjo player

Cons

  • It’s not as loud as other banjos

Need more information? Read full Oscar Schmidt OB5 review.

#8: Washburn Americana B9

Are you looking to hone your skills for playing Bluegrass or country music? If so, the Washburn B9 will make a fantastic addition to your arsenal of musical instruments. It’s affordable and has all the essential features that a beginner banjo should have.

Equipped with a mahogany resonator, this banjo delivers a bright tone and a decent amount of projection- making it perfect for playing bluegrass. Factor in the Remo head and ebony-topped maple bridge and you have a banjo that’s ready for any jam session.

Washburn Americana B9, Resonator Banjo
  • 5-String banjo with Mahogany resonator and aluminum rim
  • 11" Grooved tension hoop with authentic Remo head
  • Geared 5th string planetary Tuner, and die cast tuners with Pearloid buttons for smooth tuning
  • Ebony-tipped Maple Bridge for pristine articulation
  • Chrome armrest adds to playing comfort

Last update on 2020-05-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Includes a chrome armrest, which enhances comfort when playing
  • Geared 5th tuner makes for smooth tuning
  • Mahogany resonator results in good note definition

Cons

  • The craftsmanship can be improved

Need more information? Read full Washburn Americana B9 review.

Beginner Banjo Buying Guide

As with any musical instrument, you’ll find thousands of banjo variations, if not more. Some are better suited for a particular playing style. Others are designed for beginners while others require the proficiency of an advanced banjo player.

Listed below are the general features that you should look for when purchasing your first banjo.

Price

As a novice banjo player, one of the factors you should take into account is pricing. If you’re only testing the waters, then you shouldn’t spend a fortune purchasing your first instrument. Instead, you should buy a simple instrument that has no frills. Once you have a feel of how the banjo works, you can look for a more advanced model.

However, if you’ve already made up your mind to play this instrument professionally, then you can go all in and purchase a quality model like Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo. Such an instrument provides a middle-ground learning avenue, that is, it can be played by both novice and advanced banjo players.

Keep in mind that the price of this musical instrument will vary based on several aspects such as brand, materials used in construction as well as features such as resonators and string numbers.

Brand

A banjo is considered one of the toughest stringed instruments to shop for. But there are a couple of brands that always make high-quality musical instruments; hence, can be relied on. Here’s a list of the best banjo brands, and those that you should stay away from:

Best Banjo Brands

  • Deering
  • Oscar Schmidt
  • Jameson Guitars
  • Gold Tone
  • Pyle
  • Washburn

Banjo Brands to Avoid

  • Epiphone
  • Rogue

String Number

The number of strings in a banjo affects two key aspects. For one, it determines how many notes the instrument can play. Secondly, it affects the type of music that can be played with the banjo.

For a beginner, you’ll find a 5-string banjo to be the most user-friendly. In fact, this is the most commonly-used among banjo players. A 6-string banjo, on the other hand, makes it easier to play songs that are played on a guitar. So if your aim is to play only banjo music, you can stick to the 5-string model.

Playability

The ease of playing your banjo will mainly depend on whether it has ergonomic features. A lot of times, you’ll come across instruments that are better suited for advanced players. For instance, some have thicker necks that can be difficult to get used to. If you’re a beginner, look for one that has a D-shaped and much slimmer neck as it’s easier to handle.

Unfortunately, it can be challenging to determine the shape or structure of a particular banjo when you’re purchasing online.

The best thing to do in this case is to visit a local store that sells similar instruments. Even though you won’t purchase from this store, you can request to view and assess the banjo’s structure before buying it online.

Also, don’t forget to read customer reviews. Though buyers often have differing opinions on products, you can get a rough idea of how the instrument feels and performs based on these reviews.

Weight

Another factor you should take into consideration is the weight. Banjos, particularly the high-end models, can be quite bulky. So if you’re prone to back problems, have a small build or plan to carry the banjo with you often, you might want to look for something lighter.

When examining the weight of the banjo, also consider the number of hours you’ll spend playing the instrument. If you’re only playing it for a few hours each week, a 12-pound banjo might not feel heavy. However, if you’ll be playing it several hours every day, then a lighter model is a better option.

Types of Banjos: 4-String vs. 5-String vs. 6-String

One aspect that makes the banjo a versatile instrument is the number of strings it has. Unlike guitars, you can get one that has 4, 5, or 6 strings. A 5-string is the most common and it’s used for different styles of music- folk, country, bluegrass, classical, and rock.

A 4-string banjo is better suited for Dixieland and Irish music. As you’ll learn later, the 6-string is similar to guitar and is hence used to play the kinds of songs that are played on a guitar.

You may also come across hybrid banjos although these are not as common as the 4- and 5-string. These include the banjo mandolin and the banjo ukulele.

Banjo Playing Styles

There are different ways of playing the banjo. Here’s a list of the most common playing styles and sounds:

Clawhammer

This is the most traditional style of playing the banjo and it generates a mellow sound. It requires a player to make down-picking movements on the strings using either the index or middle finger. The reason why it’s called a clawhammer style is that your hand forms a sort of “claw” shape while your finger strums the strings gently but firmly like a hammer.

Examples of musicians who have used this style of the banjo are Doc Watson, Neil Young, and Ricky Scaggs.

Bluegrass

Earl Scruggs is the mastermind behind this style of banjo. He introduced this style when he first appeared on the Grand Ole Opry alongside Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys back in 1945. Since then, a majority of bluegrass banjo players have always mimicked his play style.

Bluegrass is normally performed with a thumb pick, and finger picks on the index and middle fingers. It’s referred to as a three-finger style and it’s very common when playing fast-tempo bluegrass or Southern gospel music.

Irish Folk

As you can probably guess, this style of a banjo has its origin in Ireland. It’s usually played on a 4-string and short-necked banjo. Another distinct feature of this style is that it requires the banjo to be tuned like a fiddle and mandolin. The benefit of this is that the player learns a bit about playing each of these instruments.

Dixieland Jazz Style

This banjo-style was initially performed by bands from New Orleans such as Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five. Dixieland Jazz is often played on the 4-string tenor and plectrum banjos.

Resonator vs. Open-Back

Other than the number of strings, banjos can also be classified as either resonators or open-back.

The easiest way to distinguish between these two is to focus on the type of music played on either instrument. To that regard, open-back banjos are used for old-time songs and folk while resonators are used for bluegrass and country music.

A resonator banjo can be identified using a ‘bowl’ or resonator located on its rear. This helps to reflect a considerable portion of the sound to the audience. This feature comes in handy when you’re playing alongside a loud band or are competing to be heard in a jam session.

These banjos also have bulky metal tone rings inside. These come into contact with the head, amplifying the volume while also giving the resulting tones a distinctive attribute.

An open-back banjo differs in that much of this sound is absorbed by the performer. This is why the resulting sound is more mellow and it comes out in an intimate tone.

The playing style employed with either instrument also differs. Playing bluegrass or country typically involves fingerpicking whereas old-time and folk songs involve frailing or claw hammering.

Left-Handed vs. Right-Handed

Before purchasing your first banjo, another choice you’ll need to make is between the left-handed and right-handed options. This will depend, primarily, on your dominant hand. If the right hand is your dominant one, then ensure your banjo is set up in a way that works with it.

New vs. Used Banjos

If you’re just getting started on playing this musical instrument, you may consider purchasing one that’s already used. This way, you can save money, and still get an opportunity to learn how it works.

While a used banjo can save you a significant amount of money, it’s wise to check its quality of construction to ensure it’s in good working condition. Here are a few things you should do when buying a used banjo.

Buy from a retailer/individual that you can trust

A majority of stores, especially those that specialize in musical instruments, take in used banjos. Some retailers allow trade-ins from individuals looking to upgrade to newer models. Other stores accept used banjos ‘on consignment’ meaning they allow to sell them on behalf of the original owner.

Purchasing a used banjo from such stores is a safe bet. Just ensure that the store has a good reputation, provides excellent customer support and has a repair department. This way, you can happily take your banjo for repairs whenever the need arises.

Inquire if you can return the banjo

Throughout the years, we’ve heard tales of newbies who purchased banjos that had been advertised as being in ‘pristine condition’, only to end up with non-functional instruments. To avoid a similar incident, you should ask the seller whether they have a return policy. This guarantees that you can get a refund in case the banjo ends being in a poor state.

While pictures are an excellent way of advertising, you should not consider them to be a true reflection of the used banjo being advertised. Thus, it’s always wise to meet the seller in person and assess the condition of the banjo before purchasing it.

FAQs

Is it hard to learn to play the banjo?

One of the biggest myths about banjos is that they’re difficult to play. But the truth is, you can learn to play this instrument pretty quickly. You can even play a song with it, a month after learning banjo basics.

The only thing that separates novice players from professionals is the relaxed manner in which the latter group plays the instrument. Advanced players generate music with perfect timing, a lot of precision, excellent tone, correct technique, and faster tempos.

We can almost conclude that playing the banjo is more of a physical challenge rather than a mental one. This is because it involves a lot of repetitions and requires a bit of physical fitness to master the skills needed to play a 5-string.

Which is easier to learn between guitar and banjo?

If you’re new to music, you might find it hard to choose between guitar and banjo. They’re both string instruments and look pretty similar. If you’re torn between the two instruments, consider the following aspects:

  • Size of the neck – compared to the guitar, the banjo has a much slimmer neck- an aspect that makes it easier to fret the strings. Essentially, you’ll find it easier to navigate your hand around the neck and fret its strings. For this reason, the banjo might seem like a better option for beginners.
  • Strings – on the same note, the banjo has lighter gauge strings. What this means is that they’re lighter, and subsequently, easier to fret. So if you’re looking for an instrument that you can play for hours on end without fatiguing your fingers, the banjo might be the ultimate solution.
  • Open Tuning – with the 5-string banjo, the typical tuning is the open G tuning, that is, G, D, G, B, D. Conversely, that for a guitar is E, A, D, G, B, E. Overall, it’s easier to start playing the banjo than the guitar. This is because strumming the strings on the open-tuned banjo sounds better than strumming the open strings on a guitar.
  • Styles of Music – another aspect that can help you decide between the guitar and the banjo entails your favorite style of music. Guitars can be used to play an array of music styles but so can the current banjos.

Initially, it was believed that the banjo could only be used to play bluegrass or folk music. But this couldn’t be farther from the truth. The banjo is a highly versatile instrument, which is now used for all styles of music ranging from rock to jazz, country, and even hip hop.

Ultimately, it boils down to the instrument that you like playing most or which one is easier to learn depending on aspects such as the number of strings and size.

How much does a decent banjo cost?

You can find the best beginner banjos with as little as $250 to $270. But oftentimes, such instruments aren’t as sturdy or durable as their higher-end counterparts. This is not to mean that you should spend $1,000 or more on your first banjo.

You can find premium-quality banjos that will last for a long time with at least $400. For instance, the Deering Goodtime banjo is in this price range and it’s perfect for beginners.

Final Verdict

The banjo has been a favorite instrument for many musicians, for a pretty long time. One of its admirable attributes is that it can be used to play a variety of music; from country to modern pop and rock.

However, selecting your first banjo can be a little challenging, especially if you’re new to string instruments. Luckily, we’ve provided all the information you need to know before purchasing your first banjo. We’ve also reviewed a couple of models that are perfect for beginners. Our favorite pick is Jameson Guitars 5-String Banjo. If you are short of money choose Resoluute 5 String Resonator Banjo. And if you are looking for top quality beginner banjo, Deering Goodtime 5-String Banjo will just do a job.

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